What’s wrong with Resumes

Resumes can place emphasis on the wrong data for screening. As such, candidate pools get reduced using inappropriate, yet conveniently available data. This makes for an easy query, but not necessarily an effective approach to finding the best candidates.

Resumes have made life difficult: Two Examples: Company A. This company had historically received 500 unsolicited resumes through the mail each year. After putting an “e-mail your resume here” button on their website, they received about 5,000 unsolicited resumes the next year. No changes were made in recruitment advertising.

The unintended consequences of this were resume spam, increased candidate expectations for communication, data storage, and retrieval challenges, and having to create a labor-intensive, manual process to sift through mass numbers of resumes. Company B: This company’s applicant tracking systems (ATS) database averages 1,200 resumes per opening/hire.

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Resume Volume: Can You Handle It?

Lately, I have been meeting corporate recruiters whose sourcing strategy has been shaped by negative conditioning. Sheer volumes of responses have conditioned them to avoid exposure for their job positions.

These recruiters have retreated from the major national-brand job board, and are beginning to shrink back even from posting to the corporate website. But is narrowing candidate sourcing venues the right response?

Does that best serve the recruiters’ goals? What forces have converged to create the sheer volume of resumes?

The demographics of the current and future workforce, use of the Internet, unemployment, and turnover rates have all contributed to the ease of, and the motivation for, jobseekers to apply online.

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